Three Powerful Reasons to Include Physical Exercise on Your Resume

If you are a runner, swimmer, cyclist or engaged in any regular form of physical exercise, should you include it on your resume?

It has long been debated if hobbies should be included on resumes. There is support for including hobbies. A hobby may help the applicant connect with the hiring manager, project a well-rounded personality or add a personal touch to an otherwise formal document. The key Cyclistword here, however, is “may.” Opponents suggest that unless the hobby is related to the job it should not be included.  They instruct you not to include hobbies as they are often irrelevant to the job, may make the resume too long and distract from the resume’s main focus.

There is something different, however, about physical activity and exercise. Promoting personal exercise habits on your resume often provides a unique advantage over other hobbies and interests. There are 3 powerful reasons why including your exercise regiment on your resume can be a good move:

  1. Employers are looking for physically healthy employees. I have purposefully listed this reason first because employers are increasingly becoming health-conscience. Employers are Read more of this post
Advertisements

Employee Wellness: What are Outcome-based Incentives?

Outcome-based Incentives are the new buzz words in Employee Wellness. As employers look to employee wellness plans to minimize the rising cost of healthcare and keep employees productive and engaged, there is a growing emphasis on outcome-based incentives. Furthermore, with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) encouraging the use of Outcome-based Incentives, their use is expected to spread. Therefore, what are outcome-based incentives?

Outcome-based Incentives are employee wellness programs where employees receive a financial reward for meeting specific health outcomes. In some programs there may also be a penalty for failing to meet the health goals. A primary purpose of Outcome-based Incentives is to increase participation by employees through the motivation of financial reward. Read more of this post

The Best Improvement to Your Employee Benefit Package May Not Cost You Anything

EAPSometimes the best way HR Directors and small business owners can improve their Employee Benefits offering is to better communicate what is already provided.

Often it is the employees who do not take the time to listen to, or read, the information we provide for them. At times, however, we in HR are at fault for not communicating effectively. Typically, we will provide adequate information regarding the most notable benefits such as the retirement plan and health, dental and disability insurance. However, one hidden treasure rarely getting meaningful air-time during the annual open enrollment meeting is the Employee Assistance Program, (EAP).

With stress being a leading cause of medical and disability claims, we owe it to our employees and our organizations to effectively communicate what is provided through the EAP—and communicate it often.

We recently gathered our staff to discuss the wellness offerings we provide for our employees. We introduced a few new initiatives including the opportunity to earn a new pair of exercise shoes, reimbursement for gym memberships and quarterly wellness educational opportunities. However, we used a lengthier segment to explain an underused, and often overlooked, benefit that could have a significant impact on the wellbeing of our employees—our Read more of this post

Why Employers Are Now Addressing Stress in the Workplace

Speaking to a group of employee benefit brokers from around Atlanta, Ron Bachman shared revealing statistics about the role of stress in the workplace including how 21.5% of all healthcare costs are stress-related. His emphasis on how stress dramatically clogs productivity was driven home later that same day as we learned Don Perry, Vice President of Public Relations for Atlanta-based Chick-fil-A, had died suddenly of an apparent heart attack.  Was Perry’s death a vivid illustration of what Bachman was addressing?

When Perry died he and Chick-fil-A had been in a public relations quandary in the wake of Dan Cathy voicing his support of the Biblical view of marriage. Vocal gay-rights advocates, along with a few politicians and businesses, railed the fast-food giant while many Christians and conservatives praised Cathy and the company for their traditional family values. While the Los Angeles Timesreported Perry had issued a statement writing “going forward, our intent is to leave the policy debate over same-sex marriage to the government and political arena,” he was, no doubt, engaged in determining how the company would respond to a very public debate.

I certainly cannot be definitive on the cause of Perry’s death. Was it a heart attack? If so, was it brought on or hastened by stress? Read more of this post

The Most Overlooked Critical Piece of an Employee Wellness Plan

AfamilyEmployee wellness is catching on. Organizations are creating employee wellness teams and displaying wellness posters throughout the facilities for their employees. Some employers invite their employees outside for an additional 15 minutes at lunch for Friday Frisbee. Others hand out pedometers and offer “Lunch & Learns” for employees on healthy eating and how to read food labels.

Notice, however, the key word – Employee. If all of the focus is on the employee then our wellness programs may fall well short of the intended results. The most successful wellness initiatives target Read more of this post

The Five Most Dangerous Trends in Employee Wellness

The standing room only crowd evidenced the growing interest in employee wellness. Even the late afternoon time slot couldn’t keep docattendees at the 2012 SHRM National Conference in Atlanta, Georgia from cramming into the room to hear Brad Cooper, CEO of US Corporate Wellness speak on the topic of wellness.

The message was succinct and pointed as he highlighted The Five Most Dangerous Trends in Employee Wellness:

1.   Check the Box

In most of life, showing up is a good start, but not enough. Like the guy sitting on the exercise bike at the gym reading his magazine while leisurely pushing the pedals, effective employee wellness without strategic effort will have little impact. Lining up employees for a Health Risk Assessment (HRA), Lunch and Learns, or hanging wellness posters are good, but if they are simply Read more of this post

Who Qualifies to Be Your Corporate Wellness Champion?

ChampionThere is a significant misconception in many organizations who aim to birth an employee wellness strategy. This misconception revolves around the question of who qualifies to be the Wellness Champion for the organization. The prevailing opinion will often be that the only people worthy of leading the wellness strategies are either nutritionists, dietitians, nurses or fitness gurus. While having an understanding of nutrition and fitness certainly is helpful to whoever is leading the wellness program, it is not the primary qualification. I likened it to the latter section of a job description where the recruiter will list qualifications that are “a plus” but not necessary.

Effective Wellness Champions are first business oriented. They are equipped with a well-rounded set of business acumen skills. Holly Firestine, Manager for Wellness and Worklife at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, affirms this. She comments, “A business approach to wellness, where there is a true strategic approach to programming and measurement that aligns with corporate strategy, is critical to the success of anyone seeking to lead Wellness in the workplace.” She continues by adding, “The Wellness Leader must have the ability to sustain the culture through stakeholder engagement throughout all leadership and staff levels in order to establish credibility and authenticity with all employees.”

Your athletic trainer may be effective in a Zumba class, but can she effectively lead in helping the organization meet its strategic initiatives? Employers are wise to look outside the circles of Athletic Trainers, Iron Men and Nutritionists when seeking to fill the position commonly referred to as the company Wellness Coordinator. Read more of this post