Seven Simple Ways to Encourage Employee Participation in Corporate Races

Now what? How do your form a team? Your organization has agreed to participate inSign Up Button Shows Members And Subscriptions a corporate 5K race and you want to be well represented. A sign-up sheet has been placed in the break room or on the company portal. You know and understand the benefits of corporate races, but how do you entice your employees to join the team?

Here are six simple ways to encourage your employees to participate in corporate races. Read more of this post

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What is the Difference between Wellness and Well-being?

arabiaMountainWhen we think of wellness, our thoughts often race to fitness, physical health and nutrition. Other wellness practitioners, however, say we need to move from Wellness to an understanding of Well-being.

What is Well-being?

While wellness is often a focus on physical health, well-being is a term that helps us grasp the importance of understanding that total health is more than the physical. Some will refer to this as total wellness, holistic wellness or a whole of life experience.

Well-being includes physical health, but it also includes additional key aspects of our lives such as Emotional, Psychological, Mental and Intellectual health. Social and Community health, where there is a sense of belong, are often included. Spiritual health is also often inserted into the conversation, such as in The Daniel Plan where the Biblical phrase of body, mind and spirit is used to demonstrate the scope of well-being.

Having a sense of Purpose is sometimes incorporated into the discussion on well-being, while Financial health is a common component of even some of the most basic wellness offerings. Even Career and Occupational health is included in well-being. Others will add Read more of this post

Long Live The Employee!

OldManHave any 100-year-old employees on your payroll? Most likely, you don’t. Yet, what if your employees engaged in healthy lifestyles which enabled them to live 30, 40 or 50 years beyond retirement? I’m not advocating employing 95 year-olds. However, my hunch is if you have employees who will eventually reach the age of 100 then their current physical fitness is contributing to their productivity on the job.

Dan Buettner is the author of The Blue Zones, a New York Times Bestseller. The Blue Zones is a book providing “lessons for living longer from the people who’ve lived the longest.” Buettner does not target employers, but the principles shared certainly have implications for employee wellness.

The research is conducted among four groups of people who have a significantly higher percentage of inhabitants living to be centenarians, (100 years of age or older). The four Blue Zone communities are found in the Barbagia region of Sardinia in Italy, Okinawa in Japan, Loma Linda, California in the United States, and on the Nicoya Peninsula in Costa Rica.

Studies have shown only about 25% of how long we live is dictated by genes—the other 75% is determined by lifestyle and choices. Buettner and his team paid close attention to the lifestyle similarities of these four Blue Zones and developed nine lessons to work into our lives if we desire to live longer…and more productive. What may be surprising to some, however, is many of the lifestyle choices are more “mental or spiritual” than “physical.” This supports a growing understanding of holistic wellness: Wellness programs focusing solely on nutrition and exercise lack essential elements of effective health promotion. Read more of this post

Yes, There ARE Employer Wellness Initiatives that Bring Immediate Results

Most of us who are actively engaged in Employee Wellness will affirm the best initiatives call for patient commitment. Outcome Based employee wellness plans offer long-term and maximum results, but the gratification is often delayed. However, I was recently introduced to a simple initiative that can bring immediate results.  Better yet, not only can it be immediately effective, but the cost is minimal. Read more of this post

The Company That Solved Health Care

When your company’s wellness program rations Viagra then you know there is an extensive wellness initiative in place. So it is at Serigraph, a Wisconsin-based company with 1,500 employees in Wisconsin, Mexico, China and India.

Following a presentation I gave on Employee Wellness, one of the participants came to me and recommended I read John Torinus Jr.’s The CompanySolved (1)Company That Solved Health Care. What a great recommendation. Thanks Batya!

Torinus served 20 years as CEO of Serigraph, and now serves as its active Chairman. With compelling detail, he shares how he involved their employees in their own health, enabling them to be effective consumers. It’s healthcare consumerism in overdrive. Five years into the reform, Serigraph spends one-third less than the national average to insure its workers. Read more of this post

Three Powerful Reasons to Include Physical Exercise on Your Resume

If you are a runner, swimmer, cyclist or engaged in any regular form of physical exercise, should you include it on your resume?

It has long been debated if hobbies should be included on resumes. There is support for including hobbies. A hobby may help the applicant connect with the hiring manager, project a well-rounded personality or add a personal touch to an otherwise formal document. The key Cyclistword here, however, is “may.” Opponents suggest that unless the hobby is related to the job it should not be included.  They instruct you not to include hobbies as they are often irrelevant to the job, may make the resume too long and distract from the resume’s main focus.

There is something different, however, about physical activity and exercise. Promoting personal exercise habits on your resume often provides a unique advantage over other hobbies and interests. There are 3 powerful reasons why including your exercise regiment on your resume can be a good move:

  1. Employers are looking for physically healthy employees. I have purposefully listed this reason first because employers are increasingly becoming health-conscience. Employers are Read more of this post

Employee Wellness: What are Outcome-based Incentives?

Outcome-based Incentives are the new buzz words in Employee Wellness. As employers look to employee wellness plans to minimize the rising cost of healthcare and keep employees productive and engaged, there is a growing emphasis on outcome-based incentives. Furthermore, with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) encouraging the use of Outcome-based Incentives, their use is expected to spread. Therefore, what are outcome-based incentives?

Outcome-based Incentives are employee wellness programs where employees receive a financial reward for meeting specific health outcomes. In some programs there may also be a penalty for failing to meet the health goals. A primary purpose of Outcome-based Incentives is to increase participation by employees through the motivation of financial reward. Read more of this post